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Common Addiction Myths: Part 2

Addiction Myths

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Drug and alcohol addiction remains one of the most misunderstood, under-diagnosed healthcare-related problems facing the Unites States today. While it’s true that we’ve come a long way toward correcting perceptions and attitudes about this chronic disease, considerable work remains.

Our goal with these posts is that you’ll gain a better understanding of what addiction is, why it’s often so hard to treat and why recovery really is possible with the right drug rehab program. Part two of this on-going blog series explores three more common myths people still believe about addiction and recovery.
 
 
 

Addiction Myth 1: Recovery is a One-Time Event

Drug addiction, like countless other illnesses, can sometimes be thought of as a chronic disease. And, as a chronic disease, recovery isn’t necessarily something that happens once. Rather, addiction recovery is often a lifelong process that may call for repeated treatments.

FACT: One in five Americans binge drink.

Addiction Myth 2: Relapse is Unavoidable

While it’s true that many recovering addicts will experience a relapse, it is not inevitable. Relapse is also not a sign that treatment has failed. With an effective relapse prevention plan and an understanding of common relapse triggers , recovering addicts can minimize their chances of falling back into the destructive behaviors that may have contributed to their addiction in the first place.

FACT: Substance abuse disorders cost the U.S. more than $420 billion a year.

Addiction Myth 3: Addicts Can’t be Functional People

Some addicts are able to hold down jobs, pay their bills on time and do many of the things that productive, healthy people do. In fact, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 76% of people who have a substance abuse problem are employed. So, why don’t more of these people get help for their addictions? One possible explanation could be because they don’t know how to tell their employers that they need help. Or, understandably, they’re afraid of losing their jobs.

Addiction Recovery is Real at The Raleigh House

At The Raleigh House, we give all of our clients an individualized rehab plan that considers the person as a whole – not just as an addiction. We believe that with the right treatment, people can – and do – get better. To learn more about why our program is different or to get help for a loved one, call us today.

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