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Addiction and Heroin Withdrawal Duration

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A man sits on a set up steps outside a building with a serious, contemplative look on his face.
Are you—or is someone you know—taking too many risks with heroin?

Reading Time: 2 minutes
 

With alcohol abuse, there can be some question of whether a person is addicted or not. Is a woman who drinks a bottle of wine five nights a week, but suffers no physical withdrawal is she addicted? How about a man who gets wasted every single weekend, but doesn’t touch the stuff during the week?

With heroin, there is no such confusion. You know when you need it. And it can happen incredibly fast.

One moment, $10 buys you a day’s worth of feeling good. But in the blink of an eye—or so it seems—$100 buys just enough so that you don’t get sick. That’s addiction.

And then there’s this: The National Institute on Drug Abuse estimates that 23 percent of people who try heroin will become addicted to it.

Exactly how long are we talking about?

You can launch an addiction after just one use, although it typically takes longer. It can happen after just a few uses, especially if there is an underlying psychological condition, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder.

At first, heroin might be just a once-a-week thing, but then a second day of using slips in. Then another. Before you know it, you’re not using to get high. You’re using to avoid being sick.

Ask around and you’ll hear a common warning: Heroin addiction can happen without you even knowing it. About the time you start wondering if maybe you are addicted, it’ll be way too late.

Recovery at The Raleigh House

How long should a heroin addict stay in rehab? At The Raleigh House, it’s our experience that 90 days provides enough heroin withdrawal time and, more importantly, enough time to begin to rebuild a life. Each person who walks through our doors is assigned a master’s level therapist to assist in that journey. Fill out our form or contact us today to learn more about the heroin addiction treatment program at The Raleigh House.

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